Photo of the Week

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Bicycles in a Parisian courtyard. © Paris Update

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Paris Update What’s On

Links to events happening this week in Paris.

Stick up for science
> The Paris March for Science begins at 1pm at the Jardin des Plantes (Place Valhubert), April 22.

Silent films from Switzerland?
> They’re rare, but they do exist and can be seen at the Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé, Paris, April 20-May 2.

Voices from the North
> The Pølar Festival celebrates Northern European culture with films, concerts, talks and more. Various locations, Paris, April 19-29.

Photo walk
> Eight Paris galleries hold special photography shows and events for Parcours Fotofever. Various locations, Paris, through May 1.

Photo shows galore
> Le Mois de la Photo has been moved from autumn to spring, with 96 exhibitions taking place all over the greater Paris area. See Web site for locations and dates.

Art videos
> The theme of this year’s Videobox Festival is “noise and movement.” Carreau du Temple, Paris, April 27-29.

Take home a winemaker
> Winemakers from Castillon Côtes de Bordeaux come to Paris to offer tastings of their products in wine bars and private homes for the event J’Irai Déguster chez Vous. Various venues, Paris, April 20-22.

French film with English subtitles
> Lost in Frenchlation shows Nicolas Bedos’s Monsieur & Madame Adelman preceded by a themed cocktail party (€4.50). Studio 28, Paris, April 21.

Polaroid pix
> The “Expolaroid” exhibition features Polaroid images by nine artists. La Maison des Ensembles, Paris, through April 25.

Binge-watching
> Festival Séries Mania shows TV series from around the world and holds debates, conferences and special guests like Julianna Margulies of “The Good Wife,” all for free. Forum des Images, Paris, through April 23.

Travel yarns
> Travel fanatics get together at the Paris Travelers Festival to swap tales of their adventures. FIAP, Paris, April 22-23.

Street art indoors

ParisUpdate-UrbanArtFair-Felipe-Pantone-2
The gallery Art in the Game will be showing works by Felipe Pantone at the Urban Art Fair.> Some 30 galleries show street art at the Urban Art Fair. Carreau du Temple, Paris, April 20-23.

Virtual reality
> Drop in on Saturday or Sunday from 2pm to 8pm for a free virtual trip at the VR Express festival. Forum des Images, Paris, through June 30.

Dance in historic sites
> Monuments en Mouvement offers free dance performances in national monuments like the Pantheon in Paris, the Abbaye de Cluny and châteaux. Various locations, through Oct. 21.

African culture festival
> The 100% Afriques festival showcases dance, theater, music, fashion, design, art, food and more from all over the continent. La Villette, Paris, through May 28.

Before and after ecological disaster
> The Chic Planète festival presents two types of films, those celebrating the bounty of the earth and science-fiction views of what will happen after an ecopalypse. Forum des Images, Paris, through April 13.

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Hot Topics - Tales of the Provinces

 

Markets and More

samatan foie gras market

No dead ducks, just dead geese at the marché au gras in Samatan in the Gers.

Having spent a good part of August driving around France, I am happy to report that provincial markets are as lively and eccentric as ever. From the stacked rows ...

samatan foie gras market

No dead ducks, just dead geese at the marché au gras in Samatan.

Having spent a good part of August driving around France, I am happy to report that provincial markets are as lively and eccentric as ever. From the stacked rows of fresh fruit and vegetables at the Cluny Saturday market in Burgundy to the extreme tackiness of the Sunday market in the shadow of the Saint Sernin Basilica in Toulouse to the extraordinary array of livestock in the Samatan Monday animal market in the Gers, no visitor to the deepest recesses of France should miss the opportunity to experience such visual, olfactory and gustatory pleasures.

The small town of Samatan has little to recommend it from a touristic point of view, but the huge market is a sight to behold. Music and announcements are piped out, Soviet-style, from loudspeakers throughout the town, and the animal halls echo with clucks and squeals as farmers go about their business. Asked by English friends who have a property nearby to haggle over the price of various animals, I emerged from some bruising encounters with a thickset woman farmer (whose stall, somewhat bizarrely, has a sign forbidding people from taking photos of her), with two piglets and an array of ducks who looked mightily relieved to have been spared the cooking pot in the heart of foie gras country.

On the culinary front, the undoubted highlight was a meal in a small village in the middle of nowhere in the department of Corrèze. As lunchtime approached, while driving between Burgundy and the Gers, my traveling companion and I decided to head away from the highway for a few miles and stop at the first restaurant we found, which turned out to be in a village called Sainte-Féréole. As we entered the restaurant, a stern woman informed us that we were late (it was only 1:10pm). Duly chastened, we sat down hastily and waited for the menus to arrive. The only other diners were a group of manual laborers (always a good sign: unlike in Britain or the States, in France it is always a good idea to follow manual workers to their eating places if you want a good-quality meal).

Instead of menus, a very large carafe of red wine was plonked down on our table by the eight-year-old son of the owner. I was about to protest that I only needed water, but the owner’s glare immediately dissuaded me from complaining. I’m glad I didn’t: the wine was costaud (hearty) but tasty. This was swiftly followed by bowls of soupe au seigle (rye soup), the most delicious soup I have tasted.

Realizing by this time that there would be no choice involved, we submitted willingly to the delight of not knowing what would be served next. Plate after plate arrived: green salad; a wonderful piece of rare beef, accompanied by fresh pasta; a gorgeous array of cheeses; a fruit tart and then fruit. In between courses, the cook (who turned out to be the owner’s mother) came out to question us about where we were from and what we were doing in the area. Despite showing momentary bafflement that two men were traveling together, she seemed very happy to talk about the food and the village she had clearly lived in all her life.

At the end of all this, we found ourselves faced with a check of only €12 each.

This glorious experience led me to wonder why Paris doesn’t have such reasonably priced restaurants where customers are simply given the menu of the day without any other choice. If you are willing to pay a great deal more, the newly reopened Spring restaurant provides such a service, but perhaps I should transport grandmother, mother and grandson from the Corrèze to provide the capital city with some long-lost Old World charm.

Nick Hammond

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