Photo of the Week

ParisUpdate-JohnGoodmanforFrenchPresident

Humor on the hoardings spotted before the first round of the French elections: “John Goodman (Jean Gentilhomme) for President,” the candidate of the “Nice Peoples' Party. That would make a change. © Paris Update

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Paris Update What’s On

Links to events happening this week in Paris.

Silent films from Switzerland?

ParisUpdate-train300

> They’re rare, but they do exist and can be seen at the Fondation Jérôme Seydoux-Pathé, Paris, through May 2.

Retail heaven
> You can buy just about anything at the century-old Foire de Paris, a gigantic pop-up store. Porte de Versailles, Paris. April 27-May 8.

Voices from the North
> The Pølar Festival celebrates Northern European culture with films, concerts, talks and more. Various locations, Paris, through April 29.

Photo walk
> Eight Paris galleries hold special photography shows and events for Parcours Fotofever. Various locations, Paris, through May 1.

Photo shows galore
> Le Mois de la Photo has been moved from autumn to spring, with 96 exhibitions taking place all over the greater Paris area. See Web site for locations and dates.

Art videos
> The theme of this year’s Videobox Festival is “noise and movement.” Carreau du Temple, Paris, April 27-29.

French film with English subtitles
> Lost in Frenchlation shows Nicolas Boukhrief’s La Confession, preceded by a themed cocktail party (€4.50). Studio 28, Paris, April 28.

Virtual reality
> Drop in on Saturday or Sunday from 2pm to 8pm for a free virtual trip at the VR Express festival. Forum des Images, Paris, through June 30.

Dance in historic sites
> Monuments en Mouvement offers free dance performances in national monuments like the Pantheon in Paris, the Abbaye de Cluny and châteaux. Various locations, through Oct. 21.

African culture festival
> The 100% Afriques festival showcases dance, theater, music, fashion, design, art, food and more from all over the continent. La Villette, Paris, through May 28.

 

Hot Topics - C'est ironique !

 

Halloween

halloween in paris

French kids have been slow to catch on to the niceties of trick-or-treating.

When I saw the little girl picking her nose, it reminded me to buy candy. Wait – perhaps some explanation is in order: Having lived in France for a couple of decades, I tend to ...

halloween in paris

French kids have been slow to catch on to the niceties of trick-or-treating.

When I saw the little girl picking her nose, it reminded me to buy candy.

Wait – perhaps some explanation is in order:

Having lived in France for a couple of decades, I tend to forget about Halloween, which was essentially unheard of here until a few years ago. Last Sunday it was brought to my attention when I saw a very cute little girl walking with her mother up Rue des Martyrs, decked out in an elaborate witch costume, complete with plastic broom and flat-brimmed conical hat, and elaborately reaming out her nostrils as she picked her way through the crowd of shoppers.

This, by which I mean seeing her in the Macbeth gear, reminded me that I needed to pick up some sweets for our concierge’s sons. Aged 10 and 11, they caught on to trick-or-treating two years ago and started dressing up in minimalist, half-baked disguises, mostly involving face painting with what looked like mom’s eyeliner, and making the rounds of the apartments in our building hoping that someone would help them raise their blood sugar. So now my wife Nancy and I stock a few bonbons for them on Halloween, but they still haven’t really understood the concept.

I say this because:

1) They don’t say “trick or treat” or whatever the French equivalent would be (if there is one). In fact they don’t say anything. They just ring the doorbell and stand there waiting for goodies. And they don’t have any goodie bags to put them in if and when they get them.

2) This year they didn’t even have costumes. They just rang the bell and waited for loot.

3) Then they came back about 45 minutes later, perhaps figuring (rightly) that we still had a few pieces of candy left. I guess the neighbors didn’t come through.

Anyway, we had stocked about two dozen little chocolate ball things and had only given out six -- three apiece to the two boys -- so we just gave them another double handful and that was it for Halloween around here. As my wife Nancy put it, “That wasn’t trick-or-treating, that was glycemia-driven home invasion.”

David Jaggard

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